Friday Seminars

October 18th

3-Hour Seminars, 9:30 am – 12:30 pm

***Children’s Track***

Tracing the history of infant, child and adolescent DMT from its origins to its growing applications today, this seminar highlights five pioneers work from the 1970’s – 1990’s. They demonstrate diversity through their ethnicity, populations served, and methods used. Collectively they have expanded DMT to include: psychiatric clinics for mothers with psychiatric disorders and their infants; children challenged in physical, cognitive, emotional and relational development; DMT in special education; bridging contemporary infant/child mental health, psychology; and creating nonverbal assessment tools. Through experientials and videos each presenter will describe their contributions and those that influenced their journey. (NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: Yes

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Learn the early historic development of dance/movement therapy with infants, children, adolescents and families.
  2. Understand the personal and professional journey that each pioneering DMT took to contribute to the early growth of DMT with infants, children, adolescents and families.
  3. Understand how historic DMT theories and intervention methods based on infant, child adolescent development relate to contemporary DMT practice.

Suzi Tortora, EdD, BC-DMT, CMA, LCAT, LMHC has a full-time private practice in Cold Spring, New York and NYC, specializing in parent- infant/child and family therapy; trauma; medical illness; and adult chronic pain. She is the International Medical Creative Arts Spokesperson for the Andréa Rizzo Foundation, having created and continuing to be the senior dance/movement therapist for pediatric patients at Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NYC, since 2003. She received the 2010 Marian Chace Distinguished Dance Therapist award from the ADTA. She teaches in Europe, South America, New Zealand, Israel and Asia; holds faculty positions in the USA, The Netherlands, Chech Republic, Argentina and China; offers the Ways of Seeing International Webinar Training Program for dance/movement therapists and allied professionals; has published numerous papers about her work; and her book, The Dancing Dialogue: Using the communicative power of movement with young children is used extensively in dance/movement therapy training programs internationally.

Nancy Beardall, PhD, BC-DMT, LMHC, CMA is Associate Professor and the Dance/Movement Therapy Coordinator at Lesley University, Cambridge, MA. As a dance/movement therapist, consultant, Certified Movement Analyst, and educator, Dr. Beardall’s work has focused on the physical, cognitive, social/emotional and relational development of students using dance/movement therapy and the expressive arts in the schools. Dr. Beardall has integrated DMT programs within the schools with students from K-12. Beardall has developed numerous programs for middle and high school students focusing on the prevention of bullying, sexual harassment and teen dating abuse, promoting healthy relationships and making a difference in the school community. Her community building programs through the arts have involved students, teachers, parents and community members. Dr. Beardall has been on the Board of the ADTA (2011-2013) as well as Chair of the Approval Committee and currently serves on the Educational Committee.

Jane Wilson Cathcart, BA, Adelphi University; MSW, New York University; BC-DMT; Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW-R); Certified Movement Analyst (CMA); and Certified EMDR Practitioner. Ms. Cathcart’s early clinical training was in dance therapy at Turtle Bay Music School and with dance therapy pioneer Marian Chace at Bellevue Medical Center. She has had 48 years of clinical experience in settings such as Manhattan Children’s Psychiatric Center and Little Meadows Early Childhood Center with children, adolescents, physically challenged and developmentally delayed populations. She taught in the Wesleyan University Graduate Liberal Studies Program for 17 years. Her work is shown in the ADTA film “Dance Therapy: The Power of Movement”, where she is identified as “Jane Downes”. Jane has been a Trustee of the Marian Chace Foundation of the ADTA since 1996. In 2018 Jane received the ADTA Lifetime Achievement Award. She maintains a private practice in New York City and Cold Spring, NY.

Susan Loman, MA, BC-DMT, NCC, KMP Analyst, former director, Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling Program, Antioch University New England, Keene, NH (1987-2017) is currently Professor Emerita and adjunct faculty. She served as: co-editor American Journal of Dance Therapy; on the editorial board of The Arts in Psychotherapy; former chair of the ADTA Education Committee; and on the ADTA Approval Committee. Co-author, The meaning of movement: Embodied developmental, clinical and cultural perspectives of the Kestenberg Movement Profile, 2nd Edition, she authored numerous articles, chapters, and books on the Kestenberg Movement Profile and dance/movement therapy. She presents throughout the US and abroad in: Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, England, Scotland, South Korea, Argentina, Switzerland, and will teach in China in 2019. In 2014, she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the ADTA and was awarded a Lifetime Achievement award in Munich at Ezetthera (European Center for Dance Therapy) in 2017.

Glorianne Jackson, MA, Dance Professor Emerita, founding director of Marymount Manhattan College BA and BFA dance major programs; worked as a registered dance/movement therapist in the Creative Arts Department of Bronx Psychiatric Center; taught in special education programs of NYC Board of Education and University of Chicago Sonia Shankman Orthogenic School; Arthur Mitchell’s Dance Theatre of Harlem; and the dance major program of Hunter College, CUNY. Glorianne holds a MA in Dance Education,Teachers College, Columbia University, NY and a BA in Psychology from DePaul University, Chicago, IL. She is an registered dance/movement therapist and certified special education professional. She is a dance minister; a graduate of Eagles International Training Institute and the Living Word Christian Center School of Ministry and Missions. She has participated and led in local, national and international arts programs that enhance her passion for prophetic dance incorporating the use of large twirling flags and poetic scripting.

***Trauma / Neuroscience Track***

The socio-political landscape of the United States is divisive for immigrant survivors of torture. Torture, a direct assault to the body-mind, undermines humanity. The body becomes the betrayer. Working with survivors requires recognition of their traumatic past and their resilience, often rooted in faith, grace and spirit. Dance/movement therapy, uniquely positioned at the crossroads of science and spirit, is best practice for working with relational trauma. A practical theoretical framework informed by neuroscience and non-Western healing traditions frames an in depth case study highlighting the intersection of science and spirit to restore belonging, home in the body, and dignity. (NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: Yes

Target Audience: Advanced Level

Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the unique cross-cultural and mental health issues faced by asylum seeking survivors of torture and relational trauma, one of the most vulnerable populations in the US today
  2. Participants will be able to define co-regulation and reciprocal alliance and their relationship to client empowerment within a social justice, human rights approach to dance/movement therapy
  3. Participants will be able to apply 2-3 polyvagal-informed Dance Movement Therapy-based practices or processes to their work with survivors of trauma.

Amber Gray, MA, BC-DMT, MPH, LPCC is a pioneer in the use of dance/movement therapy with survivors of trauma, particularly torture, war and human rights abuses. Amber’s expertise is represented in many published articles and chapters, keynote addresses, professional collaborations and presentations around the world. Amber has provided clinical training on the integration of refugee mental health, torture treatment and creative arts, mindfulness, and body-based therapies with survivors and refugees to more than 30 programs worldwide since the late 1990’s. She originated a resiliency-based framework and clinical approach (Restorative Movement Psychotherapy) for mind-heart-spirit, somatic, movement and arts-based therapies with survivors of trauma in cross cultural, low resource contexts, and she recently published two book chapters, one co-authored with Dr. Stephen Porges, on polyvagal informed dance/movement therapy based on their collaboration and the wisdom of whole body, moving intelligence.

Embodied learning increases productivity, emotional growth, and a sense of well-being. Participants will experience a movement-based social skills and violence prevention curriculum authored by the presenter. Self-regulation, empathy, anger management, modulating arousal & multi-cultural uses of proximity in clinical and prevention settings will be explored. New concepts that work on self-regulation, anger management, resilience, and cultural diversity as well as unpublished handouts will be available.Techniques for working with groups of families together to integrate these skills will be presented with new evaluation forms.

(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Entry Level/Student

Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand ways to integrate embodied learning techniques to create a healthy learning environment, to prevent violence in collaborations with schools and day care programs, and to work toward psycho-educational goals in therapy.
  2. Participants will engage in and learn to apply activities that address proximity through a multi-cultural lens, including how this multi-cultural view can decrease anger outbursts, over- arousal and prejudicial attitudes as well as techniques to defuse anger and incorporate mindfulness in violence prevention and therapy.
  3. Participants will learn techniques to work with groups of families within the embodied social skills approach, helping family members learn skills and develop ways to cue each other. New evaluation techniques will also be presented.

Rena Kornblum, MCAT, DTRL, brings over thirty-five years of professional experience as a dance/movement therapist to her teaching, therapy, and prevention work. She is a Senior Lecturer in the Dance Department of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she coordinates an undergraduate certificate program in Dance/Movement Therapy. She also works through the Community School Program to provide embodied social skills classes (Violence Prevention) in the Madison Public Schools for whole classrooms, families and for small groups of children needing more intensive work. She authored the Disarming the Playground book set and training DVDs, which illustrate a comprehensive, movement based, research supported, violence prevention curriculum. Rena has developed many culturally relevant approaches in her prevention and therapy work & integrates Yoga and Mindfulness into her practice. She has also written several chapters and articles on her dance/movement therapy work with children. She teaches & presents on her work nationally and internationally.

Presenters will review the definition of hypersexual movement in dance/movement therapy and explore how the use of this terminology may be inaccurate when describing cultural movement patterns of non-white clients. Using case examples and didactic learning, presenters will highlight the dangers of labeling cultural movement as hypersexual without exploring intentionality. Presenters will encourage participants to embody both hypersexual and cultural movement patterns from the African diaspora and compare their movement qualities. The implications of identifying biases and fostering a culturally sensitive lens in DMT assessment and intervention with non-White clients will be discussed. (NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Define hypersexual movement in the context of DMT and goals for intervention
  2. Explore how dance/movement therapists may misinterpret culturally relevant movement of non-white clients as hypersexual due to using a largely Western/European lens in interpreting movement
  3. Provide suggestions on how dance/movement therapists can increase cultural sensitivity to be more accurate and effective in assessing and intervening with non-white clients.

Mynesha Whyte, MA, R-DMT was born in Los Angeles, California and has over 10 years of dance training. She received her Bachelor’s degrees from the University of California, Riverside in Sociology and Dance and her masters in Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling from Drexel University in 2015. Mynesha is a therapist at the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center and staff member at Camp Sojourner, Girl’s Leadership Camp. Her previous relevant experience includes a residential treatment facility for adolescent girls; Red Kite Project, a corporation that provides resiliency and conflict transformation training to transportation companies; and Urban Blazers, a Philadelphia nonprofit that strives to create knowledgeable, confident, and competent youth from under-resourced areas by introducing them to the natural resources available in their neighborhoods. She is passionate about working with adolescents, people of color, and professionals that serve these communities to increase awareness of mental health issues and access to culturally relevant services.

Kezia Barclay, MA was born in Trinidad and Tobago and has over 10 years of dance training. She received her Bachelor’s degree from the University of the West Indies, Cavehill in Social Work and her masters in Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling from Drexel University in 2015. Kezia is a social worker at the Children Court at the Judiciary of Trinidad and Tobago and a workshop facilitator for the Creative Art Therapies Week TT. Her previous experience includes the Children’s Crisis Treatment Center; St. Jude’s School for Girls, a residential facility for girls with beyond control behaviors; and the Coalition Against Domestic Violence, a non-profit agency which provides counseling for individuals for have experienced domestic violence, sexual abuse and other forms of trauma. She is passionate about working with people of diverse cultural backgrounds and professionals who bring awareness to the way mental health is treated with the Caribbean.

This presentation seeks to expand the dialogue about race, culture, and identity, to increase cultural awareness and lay foundation for gaining skills to develop cultural competency. Expanding self-awareness, and gaining practical tools for exploring race, cultural, and bias aid in deepening this exploration. Participants will learn and understand a theory on Embodied Cultural Competence developed by the presenters that integrates concepts from dance/movement therapy and organizational psychology. This workshop aims to further guide participants in assessing areas of strength and growth with the intention of increasing capacity for navigating interactions with cultural dynamics both personally and within their respective communities.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to define and describe cultural competence.
  2. Participants will identify one way to improve their professional practice of multicultural competence.
  3. Participants will explore cultural competence through a body based perspective.

Kyla Gilmore, MA, BC-DMT, LCPC is a graduate of Columbia College Chicago’s Department of Creative Art Therapies, where she obtained her Master of Arts in Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling. Kyla has worked at Riveredge Hospital for the last 10 years; where she is a Weekend Administrator and Coordinator of the Creative Arts Therapy Department. Her previous work experience includes providing dance/movement therapy to adults in inpatient psychiatric care at St Bernard Hospital. However, she began her clinical career at Jewish Child and Family Services as a clinician for pregnant and parenting teens who were Youth in Care of the State of Illinois. Currently, she is the acting Education Chair of the Sistah Circle Group, LLC which works to promote multicultural competence through an embodied clinical lens through its mentorship, social engagement and training programs. Kyla has extensive workshop and training experience in Service Excellence, Trauma Informed Care, Trauma Stewardship, Multicultural Competence and Dance/Movement therapy.

Aisha Bell, MA, BC-DMT, LCPC is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor and Board-Certified Dance/Movement Therapist. As Director of Integrated Student Supports for Communities In Schools of Chicago, she manages a team implementing integrated student supports in identified Chicago Public Schools. Aisha has presented nationally on; social emotional learning, multicultural competence, embodied ethics, integrating movement into management, supervision, and stress management. Aisha is part-time faculty in Columbia College Chicago’s Creative Art Therapy program, where she taught courses such as Professional, Legal & Ethical Responsibilities, and Social & Cultural Foundations. She is the General Manager and Manager of Support Initiatives for The Sistah Circle Group, LLC, which seeks to advance multicultural competence practices in counseling. Additionally, she is a member of the American Dance Therapy Association’s Standards & Ethics Committee. Aisha is a member of CIS National’s Emerging Leaders community of practice and a member of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion planning committee.

Charla Weatherby, MA, BC-DMT, LCPC, LPC currently works as a clinical supervisor at Northside Behavioral Health in Atlanta, Georgia, which is the outpatient mental health clinic for Northside hospital. Charla moved to Atlanta in December 2015, after working in Chicago, Illinois in the mental health field for over 10 years. In Chicago, Illinois Charla primarily worked in outpatient mental health services. Charla also has experience working with homeless women in a transitional housing program, and with women and families in a domestic violence shelter. Charla additionally is a part of a private practice, Intown Family Therapy, which is located in Atlanta, Georgia. Charla is a graduate of the Dance/Movement Therapy & Counseling program in Columbia College Chicago’s Department of Creative Arts Therapies. Charla is the Manager of Social Engagement Initiatives for The Sistah Circle Group.

75-Minute Seminars – Early, 9:30 am -10:45 am

This Expressive Flamenco© experiential workshop presents an emerging holistic healing tool in the expressive therapies. This therapeutic dance practice allows the prescribed movements of flamenco dance to attune your attention inward with the goal of connecting with your authentic self. You will be guided in the applied practices of Expressive Flamenco© through the combination of movement and multiple arts based elements to create the relational freedom to be your true self in order to grow in self-realization, wholeness and wellbeing. This holistic embodied approach creates an enlivening process and builds connections within oneself and in solidarity with others.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Entry Level/Student

Objectives:

  1. Introduce this new emerging theory and practice as a culturally relevant approach, which facilitates a process of self discovery and authentic connection when utilized as transformational healing tool.
  2. Facilitate different embodied experiences to explore an increased range of emotions which creates psycho-social connections and development with a culturally responsive therapeutic arts based practice.
  3. Explore a new movement based therapeutic experience which facilitates joy during this enlivening process, both within oneself and in solidarity with others.

Laura Sánchez, MA flamenco dance educator and expressive arts researcher at Lesley University where she is developing her theory and approach of Expressive Flamenco© by conducting auto-ethnographic expressive arts-based research. She received her Advanced Professional Certificate in Expressive Therapies from Lesley University in 2018. She has been a guest lecturer, facilitating numerous Expressive Flamenco© workshops and has presented her research at different regional and national conferences in 2018. She has been invited to present her work at several national and international conferences in 2019 including the International Expressive Arts Therapy Association Conference in Berkeley, CA, the National Dance and International Somatic Movement Education & Therapy Association Conference in NYC or the European Expressive Arts Therapy Conference in Madrid among others. Laura has been leading Expressive Flamenco© classes in Massachusetts since 2017 inviting participants to explore new ways of connecting with their bodies, develop self-esteem and express their most authentic selves.

Angélica Pinna-Perez PhD, LCAT, LICSW, REAT, RDT, is an Assistant Professor of Expressive Arts Therapy in the division of Expressive Therapies at Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She identifies as a scholar-activist-artist working as a clinician, actor/theatre divisor and social action activist practicing community based mental health counseling. She has worked artistically, clinically and in advocacy in the United States and abroad with an interest in transnational/transcultural and social justice expressive arts based work in the context of globalization since 2003. Current work centers creativity as a form of knowledge snf decoloniality in arts based research.

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Creative Forces Network recently convened and supported a project to develop research agendas for creative arts therapy specialties in the context of the military health system. In this panel presentation, four dance/movement therapists who were engaged by the NEA and trained to work in the NEA federal research development model offer insights and basic procedures learned in this process. The discussion includes recommendations for the application of logic modeling towards the development of relevant and researchable study planning in this and other clinical dance/movement therapy areas.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: Minimal or no movement

Touch: No

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Describe the military healthcare culture and how creative arts therapy practice and research collaborations are developing in this system.
  2. Describe logic modeling as an approach to the development of evidence informed research agendas for dance/movement therapy.
  3. Identify benefits of public, academic and clinical collaborations for advancing theory, research and practice in dance/movement therapy.

Sherry W. Goodill, Ph.D, BC-DMT, NCC, LPC, is Clinical Professor and Chairperson of the Department of Creative Arts Therapies in the College of Nursing and Health Professions at Drexel University, and a Past-President of the American Dance Therapy Association. She holds a Ph.D. in Medical Psychology with a concentration in Mind/Body Studies, and her 2005 volume, An Introduction to Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: Health Care in Motion, has supported the application of dance/movement therapy for people living with medical conditions worldwide. Her professional interests concern psychosocial aspects of medical conditions, and the development of evidence for dance/movement therapy in the broad spectrum of healthcare

Robyn Flaum Cruz, Ph.D., BC-DMT, LPC, Professor, Lesley University Expressive Therapies Ph.D. Program. A Past President of American Dance Therapy Association, she is a Board Certified Dance/Movement Therapist with 39 years of experience. Her clinical interests are work with adults with serious and persistent mental disorders and adolescents. She is Editor-in-Chief Emerita of The Arts in Psychotherapy and of American Journal of Dance Therapy, co-editor of Dance/Movement Therapists in Action (2019), a book on research methods for dance therapy and Feders’ The Art and Science of Evaluation in the Arts Therapies (2013) on evaluation across the arts therapies. Her work as a statistician and researcher has produced over 50 scholarly articles across the disciplines of dance/movement therapy, psychology and neurology, communications disorders and psychology.

Liz K. Freeman, MA, R-DMT, is currently working as a dance/movement therapist at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE), an integrative treatment program for active duty service members with traumatic brain injury and psychological distress at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. Her previous clinical work has been with adolescents experiencing emotional and behavioral challenges due to a history of trauma in both residential and outpatient settings. She graduated from Beloit College in 2012 with a BA in Dance, and received her MA in Dance/ Movement Therapy and Counseling from Antioch University of New England in 2017.

Allison F. Winters Fisher, MA, BC-DMT, LCAT and registered yoga instructor. She holds masters degrees in psychology and dance/movement therapy and is currently pursuing a doctorate in mind-body medicine at Saybrook University. As a clinician, Allison has worked with a wide range of clientele, including adults, adolescents, and children in inpatient psychiatry, and US military war veterans in both residential and outpatient settings. She can be seen discussing her work with military members in the American Dance Therapy Association’s ADTA Talks series. Allison’s research, Emotion, Embodiment, and Mirror Neurons in Dance/Movement Therapy: A Connection Across Disciplines, has received awards for both research and journalism. Currently, she coordinates the wellness program at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, MD.

In this seminar, the presenters aim to spark a discussion around the impact of culture in the dance classroom, and thus, the inherent necessity for culturally competent dance educators and therapists. This conversation will develop as a result of movement experientials, which will cause participants to examine their own experiences with cultural competency or lack thereof in the dance classroom, and questions about the nature of power dynamics and dance education. Finally, the facilitators will investigate how to broaden the movement repertoire of dance therapy interventions, to the effect that this pertains to teaching and learning non-white styles of dance.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: Up to 25%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Entry Level/Student

Objectives:

  1. Examine structures of power, privilege, and oppression within the dance and dance/movement therapy classroom.
  2. Engage in thoughtful, open discussion about the ways in which we, as dance educators and dance/movement therapists, may minimize the potential for harm that occurs in dance education as a result of the aforementioned power structures and thus, create safe, positive learning environments.
  3. Explore the origins of dance/movement therapy, how those origins manifest in the movement used in dance/movement therapy interventions, and how learning how to engage with different styles of movement in an educational space could help to broaden current perceptions of what a dance/movement therapy intervention looks like.

Carlie Silva has studied a variety of dance forms throughout the past twenty years, most recently under the instruction of Elizabeth Parkinson, John Meehan, Katherine Wildberger, and Stephen Rooks. A dancer of every style, Carlie finds her home in contemporary dance — a genre she loves for its amorphous nature. Carlie’s contemporary style combines tenets of hip hop, jazz, and modern dance forms. She is also deeply influenced by Bharatanatyam dance, a traditional Indian dance form she studied while abroad in Delhi, India. She graduated from Vassar College with her BA in Cultural Anthropology, focusing on expressive culture and the performing arts. She also minored in Human Development and Learning and has an undying passion for teaching. Carlie is currently pursuing her MA in Mental Health Counseling and Dance/Movement Therapy at Lesley University, with specific interests in how culture and identity influence embodiment, movement patterns, and the therapeutic relationship.

Rachel Kuntz grew up studying ballet and modern dance in the suburbs outside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 2015, she earned her BFA in Contemporary Dance from the Boston Conservatory, where she studied with Cathy Young, Tommy Neblett, and Olivier Besson, and performed works by Michael Figueroa, Adam Barruch, and Omar Carrum and Claudia LaVista. Currently, she is working towards her MA in dance/movement therapy at Lesley University, after which she hopes to work at the intersection of mental health counseling and social justice.

Brianna Anderson-Frazier has embarked on a variety of dance experiences and education for over 15 years. From ballet, tap, jazz, contemporary modern, and hip-hop, she has studied under the artistic direction of Deborah Mason Performing Arts Center, here in Cambridge, Ma. Continuing her dance education, Brianna attended the University of Massachusetts Amherst, majoring in dance. Today she holds a BFA in dance and has returned to her home studio teaching two Hip-Hop classes to the Cambridge youth. Brianna is currently a graduate student at Lesley University pursuing her MA in mental health counseling and dance/movement therapy. Brianna is motivated by the work of dance/movement therapy theories and practices that explore the therapeutic power of art and creation. As her education has shifted into clinical and psychotherapeutic strategies, she aims to focus on healing mechanisms of movement within a newborn/early childhood population.

Jasmine Dowery began her work with children of varying abilities in 2014 while volunteering at Emory University’s Autism Center. After graduating from Georgia State University (Atlanta, GA) with her Bachelor of Science in Psychology, she decided to merge her professional dance training with her love of psychology to pursue a secondary degree. Jasmine is currently a Master of Arts Candidate in clinical mental health counseling with a specialization in dance/movement therapy at Lesley University (Cambridge, MA). Since 2017, Jasmine has been employed by the City of Cambridge as an Inclusion Facilitator at The Harrington Community School. Additionally, Jasmine works as an Administrative Assistant for the Inclusion Initiative where she focuses on community engagement, public relations, and social media.

75-Minute Seminars – Later, 11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Bipolar and unipolar shape flow patterns of the Kestenberg Movement Profile (KMP) are described, experienced, and discussed in light of research findings, observation, and clinical experience. Biological, developmental, and relational influences upon shape flow are formulated in relation to prior propositions, theory, and new understandings. Findings pertain to correspondences between shape flow and variables such as child temperament, adult personality, stress, and interactive styles. Some manners of intergenerational transmission are identified. Presentation includes attention to shape flow patterns in clinical assessment, and employment of shape flow in clinical intervention across varied modalities.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: Up to 25%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Attendees will learn to recognize and differentiate distinct patterns of bipolar and unipolar shape flow through experience and observation.
  2. Attendees will understand distinct research methodologies examining shape flow patterns with developmental, personality, and relational psychological variables, and know key findings.
  3. Attendees will learn of the clinical utility of identifying shape flow patterns in assessment and in employing shape flow patterns in preventive and therapeutic methods across individual, parent-infant, and group modalities.

Mark Sossin, PhD, is Professor/Associate Chair, Department of Psychology, Pace University, and Director of the emerging Clinical Psychology (Health Emphasis) Ph.D. Program, teaching in the APA-accredited Combined PsyD Program in School-Clinical-Child Psychology. A clinical psychologist, adult, child, and adolescent psychoanalyst, and family/couples and infant/parent-psychotherapist, he is: Training Analyst, Contemporary Freudian Society; Clinical Faculty and Supervisor, Derner Institute, Adelphi University Postgraduate Programs. Publications include the co-authored The Meaning of Movement: Embodied Developmental, Clinical, and Cultural Perspectives of the Kestenberg Movement Profile, 2nd edition (Routledge, 2018; 1st ed, 1999); the co-edited: Mothers, Infants and Young Children of September 11, 2001 (Routledge, 2012); and Healing after Parent Loss in Childhood and Adolescence (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014). At Pace, he is Co-Director of the Parent-Infant/Toddler Research Nursery, Director of the ‘Mind, Movement, Interaction, and Development (MMID) Lab,’ focusing on studies of nonverbal/movement behaviors. He is a teacher/trainer of the Kestenberg Movement Profile (KMP).

Karolina Bryl, PhD, R-DMT/DMP, CMA, RMST/E, is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Creative Arts Therapies at Drexel University. Member of the Polish Association of DMP (Ethics and Research Committees), ADTA (Global Membership and Research and Practice Committees) and Schizophrenia International Research Society (Ethics Committee). She has lead dance/movement psychotherapy and somatic therapies sessions in the psychiatric settings and in private practice, individually and in groups, with children who have suffered neglect and abuse, have the difficulty of adaptation and autistic spectrum and adults with mental disorders, depression and schizophrenia. Since 2013, a research team member at Mind, Movement, Interaction, and Development Research Group at Pace University, International Psychoanalytic Association Lifetime Research Fellow, and 2016-2017 Contemporary Freudian Society fellow. Research interests are: (1) DMT effectiveness in adults with mental illness, (2) nonverbal behavior and the body’s relevance to psychic processes, and (3) neuropsychoanalytic and developmental research.

The therapeutic use of circular formations in folkdance shows that expressive movement need not be abstract to read as authentic. A highly-structured dance form that nonetheless fits the modern dance-based mission of dance/movement therapy is Irish ceili dancing. An accessible challenge of the body and mind, this collection of social dances features grounded footwork, a repetitive figure structure, balanced bilateral and spatial patterns, and group cohesion through a unifying rhythm. Irish ceili dancing relates the history of a culture reclaimed through movement, open to all, that promotes socialization, a sense of community, and the experience of being seen.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: Yes

Target Audience: Entry Level/Student

Objectives:

  1. Participants will discuss the cultural strengths and limitations reflected in the unique movement vocabulary of Irish dance.
  2. Participants will explore the social and cognitive benefits of Irish dance as applicable to the practice of DMT.
  3. Participants will actively experience the basic technical movement and body structure of Irish dance, learning two traditional ceili (group) dances.

Caitlin Kelly, MS, R-DMT from New York with an MS in Dance/Movement Therapy from Sarah Lawrence College (2017) and an MS in Counseling from Pace University (2015). Caitlin also holds a TCRG, recognizing her certification as an Irish dance teacher with An Coimisiun le Rinci Gaelacha in Dublin, Ireland (2011). Combining these together, she wrote her masters thesis on the therapeutic use of Irish set dancing as storytelling for the elderly population. Over her 20-year competitive career, Caitlin competed at the World Championship level, earned a National medal, and performed annually at Radio City and Carnegie Hall. Caitlin currently teaches for the Inishfree School of Irish Dancing and works as a dance/movement therapist at St. Vincent’s Hospital Westchester and Archcare at Mary Manning Walsh Home.

This presentation aims to address the significance of sexual diversity competence and its practical application by professional dance/movement therapists. Additionally, this presentation will introduce a somatic approach to sexual diversity issues which is rooted in foundational dance/movement therapy principles as well as a sex positivity and sex therapy theories. The Somatic Model for Sexual Identity Development is a multicultural, sex positive, mind-body framework which can be used by body-centered psychotherapists to support and empower clients to create new paradigms about sexual identity. Relevant case studies and somatic interventions will be provided to support presentation objectives.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Increase sexual diversity competence by defining and discussing sexual identity, sexual wellness, and sex positive ethical principles.
  2. Participate in somatic interventions to understand how the Somatic Model for Sexual Identity Development can be applied in mental health settings.
  3. Participate in somatic experiential and learn how to use the Somatic Model for Sexual Identity Development can be used by clinicians to increase their sexual diversity competence by addressing their own worldviews, values and beliefs regarding sexuality.

Susana Potter, MA, LMHC, R-DMT, is a dance/movement therapist and somatic counseling advocate in South Florida where she works with individuals and couples in private practice. She first began her journey towards becoming a somatic psychotherapist when she fell in love with the therapeutic power of dance as an adolescent. Later on in her education she studied behavior analysis while continuing to dance and graduated with both a bachelors in dance and psychology. It was only natural for her to pursue a masters degree in somatic psychology and graduated form Naropa University.  She is passionate about the depth of healing that somatic psychotherapy can provide and believes that mental illness is simply a fragmented relationship between the mind and body. Her clinical orientation is an integration of dance/movement therapy, dialectical behavior therapy and expressive arts therapy.