Saturday Seminars

October 19th

3-Hour Seminars, 10:30 am – 1:30 pm

***Children’s Track***

Presenters will share their involvement with a unique dance/movement and creative arts therapy program with children and their non-custodial parents. Goals for multi-family groups will be addressed with cultural considerations including supporting attunement and connection, building positive memories, offering education about child development, allowing for creative expression, reinforcing family identity, reducing anxiety for both caregiver and child, and encouraging families to support each other. Participants will engage in experiential exercises used with families with attention to the multidimensional issues dance/movement therapists must be aware when working with culturally diverse groups.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: Yes

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Participants will identify goals and objectives specific to multi-family units in dance/movement therapy, keeping in mind cultural and developmental considerations.
  2. Participants will describe the role of dance/movement therapy in working with families involved with the court system, including identifying challenges.
  3. Participants will discuss the social, emotional and cultural benefits to families of working in multi-family groups.

Dawn Morningstar, MA, BC-DMT, LPC is passionate about the power of movement and dance to heal. As a dance/movement therapist and educator, she focuses on the integration of clinical practice with theoretical knowledge. Dawn encourages the growth of creative, empathetic and clinically sound dance/movement therapists and counselors. Clinically her focus has been working with children and adolescents in residential treatment programs, schools and hospital settings. Dawn received her BFA in dance from Temple University, an MA in dance/movement therapy from Drexel University. She is a licensed professional counselor in PA and a board certified dance/movement therapist. Dawn was instrumental in the development of the Creative Arts Therapy Program at Philadelphia Family Court. While in England on a cultural exchange, she taught an anti-bullying program in a local primary school. Dawn serves on the board of the American Dance Therapy Association and has choreographed for both professional and school organizations in the Philadelphia area.

Elizabeth McNamara, BC-DMT, LPC, NCC currently working in both private practice and a corporate setting. Elizabeth is the Program Director for Creative Arts for Everyone at the Family Court of Philadelphia, where she has worked with families for 20 years. Areas of specialty include working with those impacted by trauma.  Professional areas of interest include leadership at the local level in the PCA and ADTA (with focus on Government Affairs and Licensure) as well as providing Clinical Supervision, volunteering with The Soldier’s Project, and serving as Adjunct Faculty at Drexel University.

Diverse cultural perspectives surrounding birth, bonding, and social support can influence perinatal mental health care. This presentation will draw from experiences of two Western-trained white dance/movement therapists providing individual and group treatment with culturally diverse clients struggling with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders within different urban regions of the United States. Through didactic and experiential modes, participants will explore the determinants and disparities in perinatal mental health and examine culturally-informed dance/movement therapy interventions for postpartum depression and infant mental health. The role of the practitioner’s position of “holding the holder” or “mothering the mother” in these delicate dances will be explored.

(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify diverse cultural practices in pregnancy, birth, and bonding and their influences on perinatal mental health.
  2. Participants will explore culturally-informed dance/movement therapy interventions for treatment of perinatal depression and infant mental health.
  3. Participants will be able to identify the social determinants of perinatal mood disorders and disparities in perinatal health care in gender, race, and culture.

Christina Devereaux, PhD, LCAT, LMHC, BC-DMT, NCC received her doctoral training in Clinical Psychology with a specialty in Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology.  She is an Associate Clinical Professor and Program Director for Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling at Drexel University and provides DMT at Drexel’s Parkway Health and Wellness, Mother-Baby Connections Program, an intensive outpatient postpartum mental health clinic. She is former Program Director for DMT at Antioch University New England and Adjunct Associate Professor at Pratt Institute. Internationally, she is on the faculty with Inspirees  in China and Dance Therapy New Zealand. She was co-editor of the American Journal of Dance Therapy from 2011-2017 and a two time President’s Award recipient from the ADTA (2008 and 2017). She was featured on NPR, CCTV, and in 2014 ADTA Talks series  In addition to other publications, she has a blog with Psychology Today “Meaning in motion: Dancing with the mind in mind.”

Gabrielle Kaufman, MA, LPCC, BC-DMT, NCC is the Clinical Director for Maternal Mental Health NOW and previously served as director of the New Moms Connect Program of Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles providing services to new parents, particularly those suffering from symptoms of postpartum depression. She has worked extensively with new families, ran several programs for high-risk children and teens, taught classes to parents of newborns and toddlers, and runs support groups for single parents and women with postpartum depression. She has published articles on parenting, served as editor for Bringing Light to Motherhood, co-developed a patient care app, organized and presented at many perinatal mental health conferences. She serves as Los Angeles coordinator for Postpartum Support International, is on the faculty at UCLArts and Healing and 2020 Moms/PSI while maintaining an active private practice in Los Angeles providing services in both English and Spanish languages.

Developed in the 1950s, Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) theory minimally explored culture and identity. Considering LMA is taught as a primary model for observation and assessment in dance/movement therapy (DMT), contemporary professionals are charged with addressing limitations related to diversity and inclusion. Exploring effort theory and movement psychology, this workshop will emphasize the importance of building connections through culturally sensitive language and a need for modernization in LMA application. Presented as an exploration of advance theory, movement exploration, and reflective discussion, this workshop is ideal for practitioners seeking to advance their understanding of effort theory in LMA in DMT practice.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: Yes

Target Audience: Advanced Level

Objectives:

  1. Participants will gain knowledge of advanced LMA theories in effort and personality (movement psychology).
  2. Participants will learn how to facilitate and observe effort patterns, while challenging the theory in relationship to cultural context.
  3. Participants will develop skills to apply culturally sensitive and modernized language in LMA, which addresses the needs of clients today.

Sara R. van Koningsveld, MA, APCC, BC-DMT, GL-CMA, RYT 200 currently works as a Mental Health Clinician in Los Angeles, California and is pursuing licensure as a Professional Clinical Counselor. Sara obtained her Master of Arts in Dance/Movement Therapy & Clinical Counseling (2011) and Graduate Laban Certificate in Movement Analysis (2010) from Columbia College Chicago. In addition, Sara has a private practice, providing counseling and coaching for adults managing stress, anxiety, and depression, and is a consultant for higher education wellness programming. She has served on the American Dance Therapy Association (ADTA) Board of Directors as the Public Relations Chairperson (2016-2018), was recognized as an ADTA Leader of Tomorrow (2014) and has also engaged in the national Public Relations Committee (2010-Present), Student Committee (2010-2011), and California Chapter of the ADTA Board of Directors (2012-2016).

This workshop honors history as repetition and invites innovation in healing through dance/movement therapy. Combining universal and diverse elements of movement healing, we explore archetypal patterns from the natural world as seen through the lens of Haitian sacred dance, Continuum Movement, and the therapeutic pedagogy of Isadora Duncan. The legacy of dance/movement therapy, reflected through these dance forms, validates the universality and diversity of embodiment through our relationship to nature. This universality makes the work relevant for diverse cross cultural populations. Casework, experiential sequences, and audio visual presentations from the two workshop leaders’ extensive fieldwork are included.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Participants will experience universal archetypal movement tools to utilize in personal and professional healing and restoration.
  2. Participants will understand, through experiential exercises and didactic audio-visual presentation, how unconscious materials may be accessed using the Duncan, Continuum and Haitian sacred dance rituals.
  3. Participants will understand the relevance of Nature’s archetypal patterns as manifested through these three dance forms as they relate to the application of dance/movement therapy with diverse populations

Amber Elizabeth Lynn Gray, MA, MPH, LPC/C, BC-DMT, NCC, PhD is a pioneer in the use of dance/movement therapy with survivors of trauma, particularly torture, war and human rights abuses. She is an ADTA Outstanding Achievement Award recipient; a recent nominee for The Barbara Chester Human Rights award, and featured expert on torture treatment through Tulane University’s Institute of Traumatology. Amber’s expertise is represented in many published articles, chapters, keynote addresses, professional collaborations and presentations around the world. Amber has provided clinical training on the integration of refugee mental health and torture treatment with creative arts, mindfulness, and body-based therapies to more than 30 programs worldwide, since the 1990’s.  She originated a resiliency-based framework and clinical approach (Restorative Movement Psychotherapy) for somatic, mindfulness, movement and arts-based therapies with survivors of trauma in cross cultural, low resource contexts. Her two most recent publications, one co-authored with Dr. Stephen Porges, are based on their co-collaborated Polyvagal informed dance movement therapy.

Dicki Johnson Macy, BC-DMT, MEd, LMHC, third generation lineage holder in the Art/Technique of Isadora Duncan and director of the“Boston Children’s Foundation” is the creator and founder of Rainbowdance . A tireless and dedicated pioneer in the fie ld of trauma focused stabilization and resiliency programs for young children and their communities, she is also the co-founder of the acute trauma response and intervention, CBI. For the past 35 years, in her career as a dance/movement therapist, she has created international healing rituals for children isolated by developmental and neurological disorders and exposure to conflict and natural disaster. She continues to guide children, caregivers, and dancers of all ages with her Isadora inspired workshops and trainings.

How can dance/movement therapists deepen their understanding of others’ internal experience in meaningful and socially-conscious ways while also applying movement observation and assessment to their work and lives? One approach to address this question offers a perspective of movement observation that describes different temperament and affect expression. Through learning about the tension flow attribute (TFA) movement patterns within the Kestenberg Movement Profile (KMP) system, participants will develop their attunement, observation, and movement recording skills to enrich and incorporate in their dance/movement therapy practices. Participants will also learn to recognize neutral flow—a significant embodied clinical marker of affect numbing.

(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 76%+

Touch: No

Target Audience: Entry Level/Student

Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn ways of observing and recording tension flow attributes (TFAs) to expand their psychomotor assessment skills.
  2. Participants will engage in multi-modal experientials and discussions to identify ways that movement observation systems such as the KMP may empower and enrich dance/movement therapy.
  3. Participants will deepen their understanding of and skill in embodied empathy in order to foster harmonious connections and build relationships.

Melanie Johnson, Ph.D., BC-DMT, NCC, Certified KMP Analyst, RYT-200 serves as adjunct faculty of psychomotor assessment at Antioch University New England. She has conducted courses, workshops and trainings in the Kestenberg Movement Profile (KMP) in the United States, Germany, U.K., and China. Her doctoral thesis, completed at Lesley University, examined the validity of the tension flow rhythms within the KMP theory. Dr. Johnson also works as clinician at Harbor Counseling Center, conducting adult individual and group dance/movement therapy sessions in and around the Boston, MA area. She is passionate about dance/movement therapy, dance/movement therapy education, and culturally-sensitive movement observation. She is the current vice president for the New England Chapter of the ADTA.

This workshop integrates the Interpersonal Mindfulness Program with dance/movement therapy to offer practitioners and their clients a powerful new way to build genuine connections with others. The unique aspect of this approach is mindfulness that arises from a physical foundation, embodied and expressed in the felt-sense connection between people, regardless of surface differences. Participants learn the six practical guidelines for being mindful in interactions, then experience those guidelines through dance and movement. Finally, they learn to implement the guidelines within the therapeutic framework, acquiring the skills and tools to cultivate non-judgmental mindfulness toward all their diverse clients and relationships.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: Yes

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Understand and appreciate the six guidelines for mindful interactions on a cognitive and bodily level.
  2. Integrate at least three guidelines in their therapeutic work with clients.
  3. Practice greater mindfulness, tolerance and non-reactivity in professional and personal interactions.

Yael Schweitzer, LCSW, BC-DMT provides mindfulness-based therapy in her private practice in Portland, Oregon, and leads workshops worldwide in both mindfulness and dance/movement therapy. She has more than 30 years of therapeutic experience working with individuals, couples and groups. Based on her deep experience leading a variety of modalities, Yael has developed a new program, Mindfulness-Based Dance Movement Therapy (MB-DMT). Her approach integrates complementary strengths of four powerful methods Yael has taught for many years: J.K. Zinn’s Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, G. Kramer’s Interpersonal Mindfulness, B. Mettler’s Creative Dance, and Authentic Movement. Yael has presented on mindfulness and dance movement therapy at international conferences for healthcare and other professionals; has taught her unique MB-DMT program in China, Israel and Germany; and has led workshops for the general public. She is a longtime member of the International Association for Creative Dance and currently serves as president of its board of directors.

Irmgard Bartenieff famously said, “Intent organizes the neuromuscular system.” Recognizing the visual images of what we perceive as our role as dance/movement therapists can help us clarify what we believe and what we consciously choose to project in our sessions. Our images may remain constant or shift within a session or from session to session. Using art materials can help us strengthen our visual imaginations. This clarity will ultimately help us become more effective clinicians.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Entry Level/Student

Objectives:

  1. Name 3 potential images of the therapist’s role. 2. Identify the primary image of one’s role. 3. Discuss the role of imagery more generally in DMT.

Donna Newman-Bluestein, BC-DMT, CMA, MHC, adjunct faculty for Lesley University, and performer with intergenerational dance company, Back Pocket Dancers. She has provided dance/movement therapy to people from 3 to 109, helping them cope with mental illness, physical disabilities, chronic pain, coronary artery disease, and dementia. Donna co-authored The dance of interaction: An embodied approach to nonverbal communication training for caregivers of people with dementia. An international trainer, speaker, and presenter, Donna’s passions are twofold: (1) advocating the field of dance/movement therapy; and (2) transforming the culture of care for people with dementia through dance and embodied caregiving. To motivate people to interact, she created the Octaband®, a tool to foster a sense of connection through movement.

This workshop invites participants to examine their own racial locations, identifying the assumptions embedded in their particular worldview and considering how these assumptions may inform and shape their approach to teaching dance/movement therapy. Critical Race Theory and racial identity development models are used as a theoretical framework for self-reflective writing and movement experientials intended to provide participants with an opportunity to explore these topics. Resources and suggestions for further practice are offered with particular attention to decreasing instances of racial oppression in the classroom. (NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement:30%

Touch:No

Target Audience: Advanced

Objectives:

  1. Participants will explore how basic tenets from Critical Race Theory can be applied to assumptions about dance/movement therapy practice and education.
  2. Participants will explore, name, and discuss assumptions that inform their understanding of dance/movement therapy and begin to uncover how their worldview is revealed in the classroom.
  3. Participants will understand racial identity development theory through examining their own developmental location and hearing the narratives of others.

Wendy Allen PhD, LPC, BC-DMT is chair of the Dance/Movement Therapy Concentration at Naropa University. Prior to becoming core faculty at Naropa in 2011, Wendy was adjunct faculty at Santa Barbara Graduate Institute and Metropolitan State College of Denver as well as a guest artist in residence at Illinois State University and Middle Tennessee State University. Prior to teaching, Wendy specialized in group work with adolescents and was co-director of Project Self Discovery, an arts-based program for marginalized youth offered through Cleo Parker Robinson Dance in Denver. She recently coauthored a chapter on dance/movement therapy and teen embodiment for a book on the use of creative arts therapies with adolescents (Routledge, in press). As a doctoral student at Lesley University, Wendy’s research examined the somatic aspects of white privilege and the potential dance/movement therapy has to address racism.

Meg Chang, EdD, BC-DMT, LCAT, NCC, adjunct professor and visiting scholar Lesley University Dance/Movement Therapy program, Cambridge, MA, is also a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction senior teacher at The Center For Mindfulness, University of Massachusetts Medical School. Authored “Dance/Movement Therapists of Color in the ADTA: The First 50 Years,” in the American Journal of Dance Therapy (2016); and “Cultural Consciousness and the Global Context of Dance/Movement Therapy,” in The Art and Science of Dance/Movement Therapy: Life is Dance. A founding member of the ADTA Multicultural and Diversity Committee and a member of NYC CATS of Color. Current writing project includes collaborating on a retrospective interview series with members of the late Elaine Summers Dance and Film company.

Angela M Grayson, PhD, LPC, BC-DMT, NCC is the Proprietor and CEO of Good Fruit Expressive Arts Counseling and Psychotherapy in Wilmington, DE. As an active member of the ADTA, she has served on the Board of Directors as charter member and Chair of the Multicultural and Diversity Committee, past President of the Pennsylvania Chapter, Vice President of the Black American and African Descendants Affinity Group and member of the Standards and Ethics Committee.

Tomoyo Kawano, PhD, BC-DMT, LCAT, NCC is Program Director and Assistant Professor of the Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling Program, and Faculty Advisor for the Justice Leadership Council at Antioch University New England. Formerly core faculty in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling: Dance/Movement Therapy Program at Lesley University, she has been developing and integrating dance and other creative arts’ dynamic processes to enhance her students’ embodied learning. For her doctoral work at Lesley University, she was awarded the research fellowship to develop a systematized embodied-artistic approach for qualitative data analysis. Her primary research interest, reflected in her presentations and publications, is in dance epistemology and its explication with research methodology, ritual and ceremony, and the diversity and inclusion curricula.

Jessica Young, MA, BC-DMT, LCPC, GL-CMA is an Associate Professor at Columbia College Chicago in the Dance Department.  Her area of expertise is in dance/movement therapy and counseling. She has presented workshops in dance/movement therapy (DMT), clinical supervision, motivational interviewing, harm reduction, and violence prevention nationally and internationally. She provides direct client services to children and adults through the Institute of Therapy through the Arts and New Prairie Counseling.  Jessica is very active in the American Dance Therapy Association and currently serves as Chair of the Education Committee.  Her recent publications focus on the therapeutic movement relationship, dance/movement therapy as a strengths-based practice, and the use of Laban Movement Analysis in bridging DMT and drama therapy.  She maintains her self-care through playing with her children, choreographing and performing, and enjoying collaborative, compassionate, creative, and caring relationships.

75-Minute Seminars – Early, 10:30 am – 11:45 am

***Trauma / Neuroscience Track***

While we may think we have intuitive access to other people’s emotional states, there is a lack of consensus on what empathy, the ability to connect to others’ emotions, is. Contrary to popular belief, emotions do not have discrete physiological signatures, rather, they are interpretations of interoceptive signals in context, both personal and cultural. Deepening our knowledge of relevant research in neuroscience pertaining to emotions, “mirror neurons”, and empathy can help us to better understand the limits of our inferences, increasing our capacity to connect with others with curiosity, care, and compassion, crucial skills in the practice of DMT.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: Up to 25%

Touch: No

Target Audience: Advanced Level

Objectives:

  1. Empathy as a philosophical and scientific idea
  2. Current scientific literature on the Mirror Neuron System (MNS)
  3. The constructed theory of emotions and its implications for DMT

Cecilia Fontanesi, MS, R-DMT, CMA is a dancer, dance/movement therapist, teacher, and researcher with extensive experience implementing therapeutic dance interventions to a range of individuals including those affected by Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease. Since 2016, she has been serving on the ADTA Research and Practice Committee. Fontanesi is currently a Neuroscience PhD candidate at CUNY, The Graduate Center. As a dance artist, she has been practicing improvisation, contemporary and aerial dance for over 20 years, both in Europe and USA. In 2015, she co-founded Parcon NYC, a collective of movers dedicated to our connection to the environment and social relationships through play, touch and reflection. Fontanesi taught Contact Improvisation in Italy and New York. In 2011, she became a Certified Movement Analyst (CMA) at the Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies (LIMS) and has since then taught movement aAnalysis at both Sarah Lawrence College and LIMS.

Rebecca Barnstaple, a lifelong student of dance and graduate of the National Centre for Dance Therapy at Les Grands Ballets in Montreal (2014), Rebecca is currently a PhD candidate in Dance Studies and the Neuroscience Graduate Program at York University in Toronto. Her research interests include movement, cognition, imagination, theoretical frameworks for dance therapy, and the development of hybrid research methods bridging sciences and the humanities. Her doctoral research uses cross-disciplinary collaboration to better understand the mechanisms underlying the effective use of dance in the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions. Rebecca is a recipient of the prestigious SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier fellowship for her research on dance and agency. She is on the steering committee of Dance Movement Therapy Ontario and the commité scientifique du Centre National de Danse-Therapie a Montreal.

75-Minute Seminars – Early, 12:15 pm – 1:30 pm

***Trauma / Neuroscience Track***

The ongoing global refugee crisis, compounded by the US travel ban and a sharp decline in resettlement admissions to this country (30,000 for 2019), has resulted in an increase of traumatization, family separation, and feelings of uncertainty in refugees. In these troubling times, with basic resources missing, connecting through creative cultural movement can play a profound role in restoring a sense of safety and togetherness, for women. This workshop will focus on the current psychological state of female refugees and provide movement experientials and clinical vignettes that are based on the presenter’s practice and research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: Yes

Target Audience: Mid Level

Objectives:

  1. Participants will develop their understanding of the current psychological state of refugees and asylum seekers in the United States.
  2. Participants will critically engage with the concept of womanhood and its cross-cultural similarities and variations.
  3. Participants will explore a variety of movement experientials tailored to the refugee population and grasp the power of communal movement.

Rebekka Dieterich-Hartwell, MA, BC-DMT, LPC is a dance/movement therapist and PhD candidate in Creative Arts Therapies at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA. She has 16 years of clinical experience with adults with acute and chronic mental illnesses, substance abuse issues, eating disorders, and psychological trauma. Her research interests are threefold: in the area of psychological trauma with a specific focus on the neurobiological effects of PTSD, in the connection between music and movement and the selection process of music for dance/movement therapy sessions with different populations, and in using dance and movement as an acculturation resource for refugees, asylees, and immigrants. She serves on the Board of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the ADTA in public relations.