Sunday Seminars

October 20th

3-Hour Seminars, 8:30 am – 11:30 am

***Children’s Track***

This workshop will explore embodied narratives for children; Through the use of film, didactic, and experiential presentation we will explore the socio emotional resiliency building curriculum inspired by the work of Isadora Duncan. We will examine archetypal motifs successfully utilized for: (1) re incorporation following acute trauma (2) reclaiming of collective joy and for 3) honoring each child as diverse and unique. The vital building blocks for the embodiment of individual and collective narratives utilized consider the influence of digital communication upon: social engagement, neuroception, and community building and the application of the narrative tools to effect healthy co- regulation.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: Yes

Objectives:

  1. Participants will experience Isadora Duncan’s children’s dances and etudes as they relate to healthy socio emotion development and relationship building.
  2. Participants will understand the neuro-biological efficacy of this curriculum.
  3. Participants will gain movement, sound and myth-based tools to use in group and individual movement therapy sessions.

Dicki Johnson Macy, BC-DMT, MEd, LMHC, third generation lineage holder in the Art/Technique of Isadora Duncan and director of the “Boston Children’s Foundation” is the creator and founder of Rainbow dance. A tireless and dedicated pioneer in the field of trauma focused stabilization and resiliency programs for young children and their communities, she is also the co-founder of the acute trauma response and intervention, CBI. For the past 35 years, unin her career as a dance/movement therapist, she has created international healing rituals for children isolated by developmental and neurological disorders and exposure to conflict and natural disaster. She continues to guide children, caregivers, and dancers of all ages with her Isadora inspired workshops and trainings.

***Trauma / Neuroscience Track***

In 2013, the APA published the DSM-5 and created a new category called Trauma and Stressor Related Disorders. Now, therapists are challenged to develop effective mind/body treatment interventions to assist trauma survivors to heal in meaningful ways. This experiential workshop will assist participants to understand current research regarding: concepts of the Mind and Interpersonal Neurobiology (Siegel, 2017), the Polyvagal Theory (Porges, 2011) and the comprehensive impact that Complex Trauma may have on an individual (Van der Kolk, 2015).  Participants will also demonstrate, observe and experience effective mind/body treatment interventions that they can use with trauma survivors in various clinical settings.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: Yes

Objectives:

  1. Discuss current neurobiological and physiological research regarding effective treatment interventions with trauma survivors.
  2. Articulate how traumatic events may clinically impact individuals on physical, mental, and emotional levels and identify essential treatment interventions to address these concerns.
  3. Demonstrate 3-5 effective mind/body treatment interventions that could be utilized within various therapeutic settings.

Consuelo V. Davis, BC-DMT, LMFT, was born and raised in New York City with her parents and eleven brothers and sisters. She earned a BS Degree in Education from New York University in 1982, obtained a MA Degree in dance/movement therapy from UCLA in 1993, and received a MA Degree in clinical psychology from AULA in 2011. Currently she is an Adjunct Professor at AULA and a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional. Ms. Davis resides in Los Angeles, CA and works in the Behavioral Health Department at Kaiser Permanente. She teaches graduate students at AULA and has a private practice where she works with adolescents, adults, couples and families. Consuelo integrates cultural proficiency, mind/body, and trauma focused treatment interventions into the therapeutic process; and utilizes a variety of theoretical models to meet the unique needs of each client.

This workshop will be focused on providing dance/movement therapists with the necessary tools to work with the LGBTQ population in clinical practice, regardless of how they personally identify. Both presenters have experience working with, and alongside the LGBTQ population and self-identify as members of the LGBTQ community. While many ADTA members consider themselves allies to this population, the presenters hope to expand their participants concept of what it means to be an ally by imparting concrete information, facilitating a participant question motivated discussion, and providing a movement experiencial focused on embodying gender identity and sexual orientation.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Objectives:

  1. Increasing participants knowledge of LGBTQIA+ vocabulary and providing necessary information for working emphatically with the LGBTQIA+ community.
  2. Expanding upon Dance/Movement Therapists clinical skills by facilitating relevant role play scenarios and providing safe space for participant questions in collaborative discussion.
  3. Connecting participants to their own sexual and gender identities through participation in a movement experiential with post movement discussion.

Alana Henderson Rock, R-DMT, LCAT-LP is an alumnae of Sarah Lawrence College’s MS Dance/Movement Therapy program and is a Registered Dance/Movement Therapist. She is currently working as a Family Therapist at Community Counseling and Mediation, incorporating dance/movement therapy with families in the child welfare system. In the past, she has worked with both neurotypical and special needs preschoolers and is passionate about working with and being an advocate for young children and their caregivers. Alana also has experience working with the LGBTQ community, most recently doing dance/movement therapy with transgender and gender nonconforming adolescents. She is currently a cohort member of the LGBTQ Institute for Family Therapy (LIFT), completing a certification for working with LGBTQ families. Her interests are primarily in diversifying the field of dance/movement therapy, gender identity development, family structures and development, and using dance/movement therapy in preventive services.

Madeleine Rose Mayer Parsigian R-DMT, LCAT-LP is an alumna of Pratt University, where they earned their MS in dance/movement therapy.  In their second year at Pratt, they interned at the Ali Forney Center, a shelter program for house-less LGBTQIA+ youth.  Here, they found their passion for working with this population and have recently joined the staff, as an Emergency Housing Case Manager.  In addition to their case management duties, they offer body focused conflict resolution sessions and dance therapy groups for clients and staff.  As an artist themselves, Madeleine has a long history of working in the arts and using many modalities of art for healing.  Most notably, they have done Art Therapy with chronically ill children at the Children’s Hospital in Boston, worked one on one with special needs children creating three-dimensional art objects, and currently serves as the Artistic Director of Sunglasses After Dark, a NYC based artist collective.

This panel presentation will discuss the need for awareness of inclusive language in dance/movement therapy work and in the community. Language related to movement-based prompts as well as language as best practice for specific populations and communities will be discussed and explored. Panelists will present experience and knowledge from a variety of areas. Invitation for participants to increase self-awareness of unconscious biases, assumptions, unintentionally use of outdated words and phrases will be offered through panelists’ facilitation. Ample time will be available for participants’ comments and questions to encourage this ongoing conversation and mutual learning.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: Up to 25%

Touch: Yes

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be introduced to the idea of inclusive language and identify one related concept to implement in their dance/movement therapy and/or clinical practice.
  2. Participants will identify at least one area of professional growth related to cultural competence, inclusive use of language, and working with diverse populations.
  3. Participants will be introduced to or review person first language, inclusive use of pronouns, in-group terms, and inclusive use of movement-base prompts.

Melinda Malher-Moran, MA, BC-DMT, LPCC, LMHC was honored to collaborate on development and structure an inclusive, creative dance program at a major performing arts center in Southern California where she served as both adaptive dance instructor and curriculum consultant. Her passion towards inclusion spawned from her work in adaptive dance and now informs all parts of her life. Melinda advocates for inclusion, drawing from principles of Universal Design, in her professional networks and organizations. Named American Dance Therapy Associaion Leader of Tomorrow in 2015, Melinda has served on the ADTA Public Relations Committee since 2012. Currently, she owns a therapy and consultation practice in Indianapolis; Indiana, heads the dance/movement therapy program at IU Children’s’ Hospital; and works as an adaptive dance instructor for youth with Down’s syndrome. In her ‘spare time’, Melinda is part of the leadership team and writes for the ADTA Blog and directs the national group Therapist Book Club [join us!].

Rosey Puloka, LCPC, R-DMT, GLCMA draws on relational, feminist, and multicultural theory in her work with adolescents and adults. She currently works in Chicago at Howard Brown Health providing individual and group therapy to LGBTQIA+ and HIV impacted communities.  Rosey is the coordinator of the LGBTQIA+ affinity group under the Multicultural and Diversity Committee of the ADTA and is a member of the Standards and Ethics Committee in the ADTA.  Rosey continues to teach locally and nationally on cultural humility and the politics of inclusion.

Charné Furcron-Mack, Ph.D., M.A. LPC, BC-DMT, BCC, ACS, MAC holds a B.F.A in modern dance from Texas Christian University, two Master’s degrees in Dance Therapy and Counseling, and a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Argosy University/Sarasota. She practices in the areas of dance/movement therapy, expressive arts therapy, coaching, and cognitive-behavioral counseling approaches. Dr. Furcron-Mack also has extensive experience in developing and implementing educational programs; conducting comprehensive assessments, interviews, referrals and program evaluations; and coordinating staff training, education and development. She currently works at Moving in the Spirit, and her position stands as one of the many Teaching Artist. She is currently the Multicultural and Diversity Committee Chair for the ADTA.

Angela M Grayson, PhD, LPC, NCC is the Proprietor and CEO of Good Fruit Expressive Arts Counseling and Psychotherapy in Wilmington, DE. As an active member of the ADTA, she has served on the Board of Directors as charter member and Chair of the Multicultural and Diversity Committee, past President of the Pennsylvania Chapter, Vice President of the Black American and African Descendants Affinity Group and member of the Standards and Ethics Committee.

Selena Coburn, R-DMT, LPC-I, Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling specializing in Dance/Movement Therapy from Lesley University, Selena has a BFA in dance at SUNY Purchase College, NY.

Drawing from the presenters century of combined dance/movement therapy expertise, this workshop will highlight the dance origins and philosophical connections between their mentors, Marian Chace and Blanche Evan. Based on experiencing two contrasting dance/movement therapy sessions, we will delve into the similarities and differences between these two methods and discuss how early commitment to dance education shaped these brilliant dancers’ philosophies. We will reflect on how dance and the steadfast belief in the therapeutic potential of dance built lasting foundations for contemporary dance/movement therapy innovation with psychiatric patients, trauma survivors and diverse clinical populations in the US and global community.

(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: Yes

Objectives:

  1. Explore how extensive dance training, including the study of world dance, influenced Marian Chace and Blanche Evan’s pioneering contributions to dance/movement therapy.
  2. Delve into the similarities and differences between the methods of Marian Chace and Blanche Evan through experiences in side-by-side dance/movement therapy sessions.
  3. Investigate the role of dance education in dance/movement therapy as our profession expands to a wide range of clinical populations and global communities.

Bonnie Bernstein, MFT, BC-DMT, REAT is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Dance/Movement Therapist and Expressive Arts Therapist mentored by pioneer dance therapist Blanche Evan from 1970-82. For over 45 years she has worked primarily in in-depth, insight-oriented dance/movement/word therapy for the higher functioning client. She specializes in therapy for survivors of sexual trauma and has published in this area. Since 2008 she has facilitated month-long workshops for survivors of sex trafficking and psychosocial trauma in Kolkata, India. Her lifelong research is on the therapeutic use of dance in indigenous world cultures. She is an adjunct professor at JFK University and is Director of “Live Is Movement” Dance/Movement Therapy Institute: In The Methods Of Blanche Evan. Ms. Bernstein has a private practice in Palo Alto, California.

Elissa Queyquep White, BC-DMT, CMA studied with Marian Chace and Irmgard Bartenieff.  She co-founded the Dance Therapy Program at Hunter College in 1971 and along with teaching, worked clinically from l967-1998.  She is a charter member of the American Dance Therapy Association and served in many capacities on the Board of Directors, the last being president of ADTA.  She teaches courses at Pratt Institute and Kinections, is on the advisory board of Inspirees Institute in Beijing. She has published articles on dance/movement therapy and movement observation.

75-Minute Seminars – Early, 8:30 am – 9:45 am

This workshop will explore bicultural identity through first looking into acculturation processes and basic concepts of bicultural identity. Different cultural constructs can be difficult to navigate especially when it resides simultaneously in an individual. Participants will be introduced to current research, be invited to explore how bicultural-ness resides in themselves, and share their narrative with one another.

(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: Yes

Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn basic concepts of bicultural identity
  2. Participants will attain a deeper sense of acculturation processes and how it relates to people how identify as bicultural
  3. Participants will understand how DMT can assist client with bicultural identity

Akiko” kiki” Nishida Yokokawa LPCC, LCPC, BC-DMT, GL-CMA currently lives in the bay area of San Francisco, California. She recently returned to the States after living in Kyoto, Japan for 3 years. After graduating from Columbia College Chicago, kiki mainly worked with children and adolescents and provided supervision for students and professionals working towards licensing and credentialing. In Japan, kiki facilitated various DMT workshops for students and professionals and taught dance/movement therapy coursework for undergraduate and graduate students. She also found her passion in providing therapy sessions for bilingual/bicultural students studying in Japan. Kiki has been active in the ADTA. She is the co-founder of Asian/Asian-American Affinity Group (AAAAG) and a member of the Standards and Ethics Committee. She is also the Co-Chair of the Global Membership Sub-Committee (GMSC). Kiki can be reached via email at kiki.nishida@gmail.com

Cultural awareness in a therapeutic relationship is the bedrock for subsequent therapist and client interactions. In dance/movement therapy movement is the primary focus through which cultural exchange occurs between therapist and client. This cultural exchange expands the therapist’s movement repertoire and clients learn new ways of self-expression. This workshop describes personal experiences of applying Indian dance tradition with clients from diverse cultures. Participants understand how Indian and African American cultures intersected and how Indian dance became the central focus in a client’s trajectory of recovery. Participants will explore new ways of moving and expressing by understanding Indian dance tradition nuances.

(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Objectives:

  1. Participants recognize the importance of being culturally informed therapists
  2. Participants increase their understanding of movement expression through a different culture
  3. Participants will acquire basic storytelling skills through Indian dance that expands their movement repertoire

Nalini Prakash, MA, BC-DMT, CMA with extensive experience in working with individuals who are chronically mentally ill within the criminal justice system. Using creativity, spontaneity and sensitivity, Nalini has facilitated recovery-based dance/movement therapy groups that value and reflect cultural and ethnic diversity, empowering individuals towards positive change. A classical Indian dancer, Nalini integrates elements of Indian dance and creative movement in her work as a dance/movement therapist and uses these tools as a vehicle to help individuals re-experience emotions in a safe and non- threatening way. Nalini has a master’s in performing arts and a master’s in dance/movement therapy. She is also a certified movement analyst and has used her skills in Laban Movement Analysis and dance/movement therapy to reduce violence and resolve conflict, while fostering social change among a forensic population. Nalini is currently a PhD candidate within the creative arts therapies graduate program at Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This presentation, based on a participatory approach to engaging women in the justice system to explore dance/movement therapy. Key ideological, philosophical and theoretical frameworks will be integrated into the presentation in order to address the conference theme of connectivity, diversity and inclusion. Principles related to feminist-informed research/practice, collaboration, and social justice perspectives will articulated. The presentation will include data from participate feedback drawn from drop-in dance/movement therapy workshops held at a drug and alcohol clinic. This feedback will be discussed in light of emerging user-led perspectives and brief therapy models in dance/movement therapy.

(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: Up to 25%

Touch: No

Objectives:

  1. Critically introduce key principles and values of feminist-informed research and practice, social justice, and participatory research.
  2. Communicate participant feedback and explore how this could inform further dance/movement therapy methods, models and therapeutic orientations.
  3. Better understand how ’embodied research methodologies’ can be used as a critical analysis tool in in dance/movement therapy research, and explore the relationship between dance/movement therapy knowledge and autoethnographic, participatory approaches to research and practice.

Ella Dumaresq, PhD Candidate and research assistant (dance therapy) at the National Creative Arts and Music Therapy Research Unit, University of Melbourne, Australia. Her practice and research focuses on collaborative, community-based models of engagement with women in the criminal justice system, which includes field work/practice undertaken in a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center. This year, her practice will shift focus toward brief therapy models (DMT) for students at an arts university. Aside from dance, Ella’s other interests include yoga, and her academic background is in anthropology and humanities prior to entering the field of dance/movement therapy.

75-Minute Seminars – Later, 10:15 am – 11:30 am

This workshop will explore one’s experience in ballroom versus line dancing through celebration in a social environment, as it parallels the experience of transitioning from the immigrant Filipino to the acculturated Filipino American. This workshop will address attachment theory, group dynamics theory (i.e. individuation, assimilation, and cohesion) and family dynamics theory. DMT applications include synchronicity, effort modulation, exploring sense of self through space, mirroring and proxemics. The aim of the workshop is to illuminate the challenges and growing edges of Asian populations through their experience of assimilating into the American culture.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 51-75%

Touch: Yes

Objectives:

  1. Explore cultural diversity and increase cross-cultural awareness in a clinical setting.
  2. Apply cross-cultural dance/movement therapy skills and knowledge through group facilitation.
  3. Integrate sense of self and professional identity to engage with diverse populations with empathy and understanding.

Joshua Manzano, MA, R-DMT, commonly known as “Zano,” is an expressive therapist at AMITA Health Alexian Brothers Behavioral Health Hospital, which serves the Chicagoland area in Illinois. He graduated from the Dance/Movement Therapy and Counseling program at Columbia College Chicago where he developed the Manzano Movement Method (M3), a seated ballroom dance program for older adults with dementia. Prior to his career in dance/movement therapy, he coached ballroom dance for many years at public schools in Hawaii and Nevada, as well as the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He continues to share his passion in ballroom dancing as a volunteer at an adult day program for persons with dementia where he facilitates music groups and his M3 program. In the future, Zano plans to pursue a doctorate in clinical psychology, and hopes to return home to expand Hawaii’s dance/movement therapy presence.

Vanessa De Leon, LPC, obtained her BS in Psychology, minor in Biology from Loyola University in 2013 and began working in the field of disabilities. In order to understand more of the pathology of the people she was working with, Vanessa pursued her MA in Clinical Psychology (Counseling Practice) at Roosevelt University while also participating in fellowship program for leaders in the field of disabilities called the IL LEND. She completed her clinical internship at a private day school for children with ASD and realized how much movement benefited her students in terms of emotional regulation. She is pursuing her alternate route certification in Dance/Movement Therapy & Counseling at Columbia College Chicago and completed her clinical internship at Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center to expand her practice to working with adults with PTSD. Vanessa is currently working with people with psychotic disorders and chronic homelessness at Thresholds.

This workshop highlights the impact dance/movement therapy experiences had in a dance improvisation class on creativity with a diverse group of students at a university. Self-report measurements such as the Kaufman Domains of Creativity Scale (K-DOCS) and the Big Five Factor Personality Test, tracked changes in personal perceptions of students’ creativity and consequently, self-esteem/self-confidence. Facilitators will include illustrations of the students’ acquisition of body awareness, movement choices, and dance vocabulary shared through journal entries and video, as well as research outcomes regarding the role cultural differences played in enhancing creativity.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: Up to 25%

Touch: Yes

Objectives:

  1. Identify the theory and role of creativity in building an individual’s self-concept and identity.
  2. Demonstrate how sharing cultural differences enhances creativity.
  3. Compare and contrast dance/movement therapy interactions and observations which fostered inclusion and community.

Carol Kaminsky, MA, BC-DMT, NCC earned her M.A. in Dance/Movement Therapy from Goucher College in Towson, Maryland. Currently, she is the director of the dance program and full-time lecturer at the University of Miami in the Frost School of Music. She designed a cognate in Creative Arts Therapy for undergraduates at the University of Miami. She has been in clinical practice for over 30 years working as a dance/movement therapist in eating disorder treatment, psychiatric care, and with children on the autistic spectrum. As a dancer she has performed with Miami based dance company Karen Peterson and Dancers Inc., a mixed ability dance company featuring disabled and able-bodied dancers.

Jorge L. Morejón, PhD started his dance training with Creation Ballet Co. He continued training at Florida International University where he graduated with a BA in Special Ed. He finished a MA in Liberal Studies at University of Miami and a PhD in Performance Studies at University of California, Davis. He has done Master’s level work in Expressive Arts Therapy at European Graduate School, Switzerland, and Doctoral level work in Theatre and Performance Studies at York University, Canada. He taught expressive movement at New World School of the Arts and Prometeo Theater, Miami Dade College. He is working towards his certification in dance/movement therapy and a Master in Social Work. He was Dance Lecturer and Dance Coordinator at University of the West Indies. Currently, he teaches at University of Miami, Frost School of Music. His doctoral research focuses on how displaced communities assuage displacement through the performance of dance rituals.

The work of a supervisor is to create an environment that supports personal understanding and growth that informs professional practices. Qualities of self will be identified in the development that transpires in the supervisory learning process. A new developmental model will be presented based on work by; Constantine and Sue; Perceptions of Racial Microaggressions Among Black Supervisees and Arczynski and Morrow; The complexities of Power in Feminist Multicultural Psychotherapy Supervision. We will also explore the qualities of self-energy based on the Internal Family Systems model. The workshop will support exploration of self within the supervisory relationship.(NBCC CE hours; ADTA CE hours; NY LCAT CPE hours)

Movement: 26-50%

Touch: No

Objectives:

  1. To identify stages of development in the supervisory relationship.
  2. To explore qualities of self-leadership and reciprocity in the supervisory relationship.
  3. To increase awareness of power dynamics in the supervisory relationship.

Terri Halperin, LMHC, REAT, BC-DMT, ATR-BC, has been practicing EXTH for 4 decades and specializes in supervision practice with Expressive Arts Therapists.  She has mentored students into professionals and supported supervisory relationships that are 15 years strong. She sees the practice of mentoring as holding the vulnerabilities and the strengths of the clinician at heart and using the work of EXTH to bring healing, insight, health and wholeness into the therapeutic work and the world.